Main Dishes

Lamb Shank slowly cooked and served with rice, dill weeds, and lima beans at Sahel Persian Restaurant

Lamb Shank = $11.99

Lamb Shank slowly cooked and served with rice, dill weeds, and lima beans

Roast Lamb = Lamb shoulder with Greek salad and potatoes at Sahel Persian Restaurant

Roast Lamb =  $17.99

Lamb shoulder with Greek salad and potatoes.

Lamb loin chops with rice and potatoes at Sahel Persian Restaurant

Lamb Chops =  $15.99

Five lamb loin chops with rice and potatoes

Lamb Soltani = Lamb loin chops and one ground beef skewer with rice at Sahel Persian Restaurant

Lamb Soltani = $19.99

Lamb loin chops and one ground beef skewer with rice

Cholo Morgh with Zereshk is Barberry rice mix served with marinated Chicken Leg at Sahel Persian Restaurant

Cholo Morgh with Zereshk = $9.99

Barberry rice mix served with marinated Chicken Leg

Ghormeh Sabzi ~ Beef, Kidney beans, green onions, parsley, spinach, herbs and dried lemons served with rice at Sahel Persian Restaurant

Ghormeh Sabzi ~ Beef & Vegetable stew = $8.99

Beef, Kidney beans, green onions, parsley, spinach, herbs and dried lemons served with rice

Gheymeh ~ Yellow lentils stewed in tomato with beef and herbs and dried lemon at Sahel Persian Restaurant

Gheymeh ~ Beef and lentil stew =  $8.99

Yellow lentils stewed in tomato with beef and herbs and dried lemon, served with rice

Point of Interest: History and Food:

  • Since the beginning of human civilization in present-day Iran, a series of peoples has invaded and conquered the region, exposing the area to new customs, beliefs, ideas, and foods, as well as bringing Iranian customs and foods back to their own home countries. The ancient Babylonians, Assyrians, Persians, Greeks, Romans, and Turks are just a few of the groups that have had an influence on Iranian culture and its cuisine.
  • Iranian cuisine is often referred to as “Persian.” This is because, until 1934, Iran was known as Persia. The Persians are an ancient culture believed to have originated in central Asia as far back as 2000 B.C. At one time, Persian territory stretched as far east as India. Curry (a spice) was adapted from the people of India and incorporated into the Persian (now Iranian) cuisine. Modern spicy curry stews demonstrate India’s influence.
  • The Indians also adapted foods from the Persians. When the Moghuls invaded India in 1526, they brought with them ingredients from the Persian cuisine, which they highly admired. A northern Indian cuisine called mughulai is modeled after what the Persians commonly ate: mounds of rice seasoned
  • Iranwith saffron, topped with nuts, raisins, and various meats. Dishes such as kofta (KOFtah, meatballs) and pilau (POO-lau) are now common to both Iranians and northern Indians.
    Several of Iran’s most prominent dishes originated from the Greeks, Arabs, Turks, and Russians. Greece invaded present-day Iran in the A.D. 200s, introducing stuffed grape leaves. Yogurt may have originated from either Greece or Turkey, where it is also a dietary staple. The Iranian food rules that categorize foods into “hot or “cold” is believed to have been derived from ancient Greek theories of medicine (See Mealtime Customs ). Dishes made of lamb, dates, and figs were brought into the Persian diet during the Arab invasion of the 600s.
  • Three hundred years later, the Turks expanded their Ottoman Empire into Persian territory. The idea of stuffing leaves, vines, fruits, and vegetables with various fillings (Turkish dolma ) was reinforced by the Turks. Dolma and kofte (meatballs) have become very popular throughout the Middle Eastern countries. The kebab (cubes of skewered meat) is probably the most important introduction by the Turks—it has become one of Iran’s national dishes. Strong Turkish coffee was also introduced. Once a widely consumed Iranian beverage, it has now fallen behind the popularity of chây (tea). The strong, dark tea is brewed in an urn called a samovar , a Russian word. Tea most likely originated in Russia.